GUILLAUMIT new video
The 1000 People Band

Guillaumit new animated video has just been released

The artist Guillaumit has created a new animated video for his musical project Gangpol & Mit.
I asked some questions to the illustrator, who tells us more about this visual extension of his musical live project.

Guillaumit

Enter the world of Guillaumit

Can you tell us a little bit more about Gangpol & Mit?
We are a duo consisting of a musician and a designer – animator, and we worked together for almost 10 years.
Our schedule is divided between many audiovisual concerts and studio work, expo, books, orders …

What was the concept behind this video?
This video is an online variation of The band 1000 people live concert you can see below.
We wanted to see a large number of musicians, each with its specific identity, and to confront them in unlikely, coherent, and balanced way. The encounters works miraculously for the time of a song.

How did you work on the animation?
We started thinking about this video about 6 months ago. I first created all the characters, then I had fun to combine them together. To animate this little world, I worked with Florian Teyssié, which did about half of the animation work.
The sync work with the music was eventually done step by step, according to the evolution of the songwriting… A nightmare.

What connection do you do between visual design and musical creation with Gangpol & Mit?
We are currently exploring a specific form of cartoon musical that links both. The virtual characters play music, be it in a video like this one, or with us on stage during the concerts. We keep a classical narrative approach in the content or the music. We don’t do, for example, pure abstract sound or graphics.

What projects are you working on nowadays?
With Sylvain we are working on a version 2.0 of the drawing tables.
We want to build furnitures and musical instruments with further interactions between image and sound.
In addition we still have a lot of Gangpol & Mit concerts scheduled.

Video interview in French

Video interview of Mega (in French language).

When I was in France last summer, I was interviewed and filmed by Lezilus.
In this video interview, we talk in French of course. We have a nice conversation about my life in Bali, my future art projects, and my love for illustration.
You can now discover the result of this exchange.
Enjoy this cool, strange and surreal video.

The interview was filmed at the Jardin Des Plantes in Paris by the talented Émilie Pigeard.
Feel free to learn more aboutLezilus, the agent who represents my artworks in French-speaking countries.

The video interview was filmed in the forest.

Lezilus filmed the video interview in the forest.

JEREMYVILLE
Interview with the Australian artist

Jeremyville interview for Acclaim magazine.

Interview of the Australian artist Jeremyville. Life is a fairy tale.
I did this interview a while ago for Acclaim magazine.
More about Jeremyville.

Jeremyville vinyl toy

Jeremyville vinyl toy

Before becoming one of the most recognized Australian artists, the man behind Jeremyville spent a wonderful childhood growing up in Wonderland Avenue, near Bondi in Sydney. The beach boy used to spend a lot of time playing with Lego, Smurfs, sea monkeys, toy soldiers, and reading heaps of Tin Tin, Richard Scary, and Mr Men books. This led him naturally to think that making a career out of drawing stuff would be a pretty fun option. So, a couple of sketch-books later, he studied architecture at Sydney Uni, began drawing at the Sydney Morning Herald, and simply became one of today’s freshest illustrators. Well, who said life wasn’t easy?

Jeremyville interview for Shift magazine

Jeremyville for Shift magazine

WHAT IS THE CONCEPT BEHIND YOUR NAME JEREMYVILLE?
Jeremyville is a project-based concept; it’s a place where projects and collaborations happen. Like Vinyl Will Kill, the first book in the world on designer toys, that I wrote, or a sketchel bag for Beck, or a collab’ comic with Geoff McFetridge, or a shoe design for Converse. It can be anything interesting and exciting to me, I don’t limit myself to just one medium, like just apparel. I feel comfortable doing lots of things, sometimes at once! I also like trying new things, new mediums, this keeps me excited. For example right now I’m doing some animation with a company in Argentina, a snowboard design for Rossignol in Utah, a toy with Super Rad toys in LA, preparing for a solo art show in Paris, an animation for a UK company, a group art show in Rome, t-shirt designs for Graniph in Japan, a comic book for a French publishing company. I like mixing it up.

Jeremyville street artwork

Jeremyville street artwork

WHAT ABOUT THIS WORK YOU HAD AS A CARTOONIST FOR THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD?
It was a great learning experience, as I had to come up with ideas for the paper on a daily basis, and quickly. You have no time to wait for the angel of inspiration to come down and gently whisper into your ear. You have to grab the angel by the neck and squeeze an idea out. I like working fast, and thinking fast. I don’t like to over-think a project, usually my first instinct for a solution is the best.

Jeremyville Sessions book cover

Jeremyville Sessions book cover

YOU DEVELOP YOUR WORK ON VARIOUS MEDIUMS FROM FINE ART, TO PUBLISHING, TO APPAREL, ETC. WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND YOUR APPROACH TO A NEW PROJECT?
Each medium is different, and requires a new set of principles to work with. But I keep a general aesthetic running through my work, this makes everything I do very recognizable as Jeremyville, from a t-shirt, to a book, to an animation. Whatever you do, you need to do it very well, as if that is all you do. Because there are people out there who only do one thing, so I never just dabble in something, I try and become expert at it, to do it the best I can, and add something to the medium.

Artwork by Jeremyville

Artwork by Jeremyville

HOW DID YOU MANAGE TO BLEND YOUR ARTISTIC INTEGRITY WITH COMMERCIAL SUCCESS?
I’m a very harsh critic of my work, so only when I feel something is really good, does it leave my studio. Also, for commercial work I generally choose images I have already drawn for personal reasons in my sketchbook, so there is an authenticity to my commercial work also, I’m not like a gun for hire. Clients come to me for what I do, and I generally choose something appropriate for them. Like for Rossignol snowboards, they just asked me to draw whatever I thought would work, and to just write Rossignol on there somewhere, it was a very open brief. Clients seem to trust me, and let me do my own thing.

DO YOU RECKON THAT THE RECOGNITION OVERSEAS OF PEOPLE LIKE YOU OR NATHAN JUREVICIUS IS OPENING SOME DOORS FOR A NEXT GENERATION OF AUSSIES ARTISTS?
I hope it is helping open some doors for Aussies, I don’t generally push the obvious Australian angle in my work, simply because I’m influenced by lots of things globally, and I’m probably mentally more at my studio in New York than my Sydney studio. Also, my work is more from a place called Jeremyville than any other city on earth. The colours of Australia I’m sure have influenced my work, and I grew up in a beach side suburb in Sydney, and that has to have had an influence, but I can’t isolate it, or put it into words, It’s just a part of me.

IGNACIO BERNAL
Interview with Spanish film director

Ignacio Bernal aka Iñaki is my unofficial cousin.

My friend from Zaragoza has been a talented director and editor of commercials, music videos, documentary and fiction since 1995.
He worked for brands such as Ikea, Renault, Heineken, Iberdrola, Horcones, El Corte Ingles, and much much more.
He also likes to play darts and to eat “frutos secos” with my best friend Leto.
Yes he is Spanish.

Extract of a videoclip for the Spanish band No Truck Truckers

Extract of a videoclip for the Spanish band No Truck Truckers

PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF
I’m Ignacio Bernal, a spanish film director from Aragón.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK?
Fiction, music videos, commercial, video art. Stories. Simplicity. Rhythm.

Canto A La Libertad, a Unesco video by Ignacio Bernal

Canto A La Libertad, a Unesco video by Ignacio Bernal

PLEASE SHARE WITH US YOUR WORKING PROCESS
When I tell a story -either fiction, commercial or music video- I 
first come with an idea. I edit it shot by shot,
 setting the style and the rhythm, trying to make it clearer. I listen to a lot of music related to this story, because music brings me images and a necessary 
mood that helps me to tell it from my own point of view. At this point the hard work is already done. Then you just have to film it.

HOW DOES YOUR ENVIRONMENT INFLUENCE YOUR ART?
I love to know the thoughts and feelings from the people around me. I observe how they behave in certain situations. They give me all I need to know to understand how everything works. Stories are seen and starred by people. We  musn’t forget that.

Extract of the video for Tedx Zaragoza by Ignacio Bernal

Extract of the video for Tedx Zaragoza by Ignacio Bernal

WHO ARE YOUR INFLUENCES?
Caravaggio always, and also Kubrick, Buñuel, Picasso, Dalí, John Wayne, good 
music, good wine, women and western.

Musical videoclip by Ignacio Bernal

Musical videoclip by Ignacio Bernal

ANY LAST WORD?
Nice to meet you.

CHAZ BOJORQUEZ
New book from the LA cholo artist

New book of the LA cholo legendary artist Chaz Bojorquez.

Cholo art and visual codes may be the latest craze for US and european hipsters, who saw the LA spanish gangsta lifestyle depicted on TV or in some trendy galleries.
But when the hype will be gone next season, it will stay a true and meaningful lifestyle for real people like Chaz.
Respect.
Recently, Chaz was part of the Carbon event in Melbourne, where he was doing a conference about his impresive and inspiring background as an artist.
More about the legendary LA graffiti artist Chaz Bojorquez.
Buy his book.

Portrait of the LA cholo artist Chaz Bojorquez

Portrait of the LA cholo artist Chaz Bojorquez

PATRICK BOIVIN
Amazing stop-motion video

Patrick Boivin is doing amazing stop-motion work using action figures.

The DIY Montreal artist created an interactive series of videos on Youtube that allow the user to choose what comes next. In B-Boy Joker, Batman is fighting against the Joker, this time in a break dancing competition. You actually play with the characters, choosing what move will come next by clicking on the video. A videogame using Youtube, pretty genius…
Other non-interactive video include Iron Man fighting Bruce Lee or Mr Bean vs Michael Jackson.
Check his Youtube profile for more inspiring videos by Canadian artist Patrick Boivin.

Patrick Boivin preparing his next video from his studio

Patrick Boivin preparing his next video from his studio