I Just Murdered The Alphabet
Character 5

I Just Murdered The Alphabet is an experimental typography art project.

check the complete solo art exhibition.

Medium used: Hand-drawn with silver ink pens on 160g acid free art paper.

Hip-hop punchlines inspiration:
I got my mind on my money and money on my mindYOUNGBLOODZ – Mind On My Money
Try to read my mind you might get wetSNOOP DOGG – Oh Sookie
Smile for the camera I got supersize swagSLIM THUG – Smile
You got a hole in you n you bleedin’ so it’s not like I’m just callin you pussy for no reasonBEANIE SIGEL – Problem
And I can go on and on and oooon but who cares?GNARLS BARKLEY – Who Cares?
I got 99 problemsJAY-Z – 99 Problems

Original handmade drawing by mega

Character 5 | Original handmade drawing for my solo art exhibition I Just Murdered The Alphabet

I got my mind on my money and money on my mind
YOUNGBLOODZ

And money on my mind.
Actually this is not true.
Money doesn’t make you rich.
I think that experience and knowledge are the true treasure we have to look for during our life.
On this aspect I am already healthy, and I hope to become very rich before I die.
What you buy in this world will stay in it when you die.
The knowledge you acquire, and the experiences you live are in your soul forever.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
I got my mind on my money and money on my mindYOUNGBLOODZ – Mind On My Money

Try to read my mind you might get wet
SNOOP DOGG

You might get wet.
Where I live in Bali people are quite superstitious. Most Balinese people believe in black magic and supernatural powers.
The black magic priests are called “Dukun” and pretend that they are able to read my thinkings.
I hope they can’t, because mine are sometimes really kinky.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Try to read my mind you might get wetSNOOP DOGG – Oh Sookie

Smile for the camera
SLIM THUG

I got supersize swag.
The funny part of doing an exhibition is the relationship with some of the attendees.
I have to say most young people who come to my art shows don’t buy artworks.
All they want is a cool picture with me.
Especially if the art event takes place in Asia.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Smile for the camera I got supersize swagSLIM THUG – Smile

You got a hole in you
BEANIE SIGEL

I make you bleed before your periods.
I make you bleed after your periods.
I make you bleed. Period.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
You got a hole in you n you bleedin’ so it’s not like I’m just callin you pussy for no reasonBEANIE SIGEL – Problem

I can go on and oooon but who cares?
GNARLS BARKLEY

I already try to do it every day of my life.
Illustration and art are something I couldn’t leave without…

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
And I can go on and on and oooon but who cares?GNARLS BARKLEY – Who Cares?

I got 99 problems
JAY-Z

Actually I got 102 problems.
102 is the number of drawings I did for this series.
The artworks were a series of visual problems for me.
What you can see are the solutions I found…

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
I got 99 problemsJAY-Z – 99 Problems

I Just Murdered The Alphabet
Character 4

I Just Murdered The Alphabet is a solo exhibition of handmade drawings inspired by hip hop lyrics

This series is a good place of inspiration for the people who enjoy hand-drawn sign paintings.
This drawing is a remix of one of my acrylic paintings, mixed with typography works.
check the complete solo art exhibition.

Medium used: Hand-drawn with silver ink pens on 160g acid free art paper.

Hip-hop punchlines inspiration:
Power to the people no delayPUBLIC ENEMY – Fight The Power
What a beautiful day to be freeTHE PHARCYDE – Summertime
It’s mathematicsMOS DEF – Mathematics
I leave your brain stimulatedNAS – It Ain’t Hard To Tell

Original handmade drawing by Mega

Character 4 | Original handmade drawing for my solo art exhibition I Just Murdered The Alphabet

Power to the people no delay
PUBLIC ENEMY

Stop complaining and take the power.
Don’t wait.
Whatever you want is possible.
When I was younger I had no formal education and no money.
I decided to follow my dreams, and to become one of the top-notch illustration of today’s generation.
I’ll keep fighting until my dream comes true.
You can do the same if you want to.
Turn off your TV and start working.
That’s all it takes.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Power to the people no delayPUBLIC ENEMY – Fight The Power

What a beautiful day to be free
THE PHARCYDE

Today I received a nice package from Dr Cotton.
It contained 3 awesome t-shirts for me, and even one for my girlfriend. What a great way to start the day. Thank you doctor 🙂
Today my girlfriend resigned from her job and will start to work 100% freelance.
Today I am working on an art collaboration with Jon Burgerman. I will show you the result in July, so make sure you come back for more information.
Tomorrow I go to Singapore to meet the owner of SUP clothing.
Today is a good day.
It’s now or never.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
What a beautiful day to be freeTHE PHARCYDE – Summertime

It’s mathematics
MOS DEF

And you can count on me.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
It’s mathematicsMOS DEF – Mathematics

I leave your brain stimulated
NAS

To leave your brain stimulated is one of the goal I intend to do through my artworks.
Hopefully, my art will inspire you to wake up every morning and create more.
Paint the world around you with the colors you love.
I can guarantee it will look better.
At least for you…

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
I leave your brain stimulatedNAS – It Ain’t Hard To Tell

I Just Murdered The Alphabet
Character 3

Third character I drew for the I Just Murdered The Alphabet solo art show

If you like hand drawn fonts, then you have to love my I Just Murdered The Alphabet art project.
I’ve spent about 5 to 6 months drawings those font by hand.
I was locked in a room, no parties, no television, no time for gossips and friends.
Just me, my girlfriend, a lot of silver pens, kilos of coffee and tons of motivation.
check the complete solo art exhibition.

UPDATE: You can now buy this original artwork here.

Hip-hop punchlines inspiration:
Stick my dick in your ear and fuck what you heardCANIBUS – I’ll Buss ’em You Punish ’em
This is food for thoughts you do the dishesJAY-Z – Intro
I act like I’m never soberKANO – London Town
How can shit be so easyEMINEM – Business

Original handmade drawing

Character 3 | Original handmade drawing for my solo art exhibition I Just Murdered The Alphabet

Stick my dick in your ear
CANIBUS

I know that it sounds like a tricky move.
But I also know that you’ve done it before.
Come on, don’t be shy…

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Stick my dick in your ear and fuck what you heardCANIBUS – I’ll Buss ’em You Punish ’em

This is food for thoughts you do the dishes
JAY-Z

I’ll feed you with my art until you feel satiated.
For now, please do the dishes.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
This is food for thoughts you do the dishesJAY-Z – Intro

I act like I’m never sober
KANO

You see me and you think that I’m drunk.
I see you and think that I would like to be drunk.
I’m joking, I don’t drink liquors.
I’m too busy working on my art…

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
I act like I’m never soberKANO – London Town

How can shit be so easy
EMINEM

I make this art look easy.
Art looks easy if you work 10 hours a day every day of your life.
Sometimes I meet artists who think that they can become successful by working one hour here and there.
I wish them good luck. Like any professional activity, art requires dedication.
You have to be committed to what you do, so people can feel your passion and start to like your art.
Ater a lot of practice, your skills make your art look easier than it really is.
Then people tell you how lucky you are to live the life you chose. I tell them they could do it to.
You just have to work a lot, and turn off your TV.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
How can shit be so easyEMINEM – Business

I Just Murdered The Alphabet
Character 2

Handmade drawing I did for my solo art show at Sergeant Paper gallery in 2012

This artwork is a new character I drew by hand for my new series and my next exhibition.
For this project I filled every artwork with some of the best hip-hop quotes ever.
Every character is unique and is part of an imaginary gang I call the Société Des Griffeurs.
check the complete solo art exhibition.

Medium used: Hand-drawn with silver ink pens on 160g acid free art paper.

Hip-hop punchlines inspiration:
Look at this face. Oh my god they’re gorgeousHANDSOME BOY MODELING SCHOOL – Look At This Face Oh My God They’re Gorgeous
Move cause we’re in a mood to fightJUELZ SANTANA – Crunk Music
Better get ‘em, where you at bro?J DILLA – Reckless Driving
Brain dead flowLIL WAYNE – Break Up

Original handmade drawing

Character 2 | Original handmade drawing for my solo art exhibition I Just Murdered The Alphabet

Look at this face. Oh my god they’re gorgeous
HANDSOME BOY MODELING SCHOOL

Some people look at the characters I draw and they say that I am inspired by japanese folklore.
Other people say that I must be inspired by the indonesian culture.
Other say that this is a modern take on african tribal art.
I tell them it’s Mega.
My characters are simply gorgeous.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Look at this face. Oh my god they’re gorgeousHANDSOME BOY MODELING SCHOOL – Look At This Face Oh My God They’re Gorgeous

Move cause we’re in a mood to fight
JUELZ SANTANA

When I tell people that I based my studio in Bali, Indonesia, they always tell me about how lucky I am.
Coconut juices on the beach. Great surf. Magic mushrooms. Tight bikinis dancing in the front of colorful sunsets… They obviously talk about another reality.
I prepared this series by locking myself in a room. I am drawing everyday from the moment I woke up until it is late enough to join my girlfriend in bed.
I don’t have time to meet my friends, to do parties, watch TV, or anything else. All I care about is my art, and I intend to stay focus until I’m on the top of the world.
“Sir, another coconut juice please.” Just kidding…
Me and my characters are in a mood to fight.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Move cause we’re in a mood to fightJUELZ SANTANA – Crunk Music

Better get ‘em, where you at bro?
J DILLA

Today I woke up with a lot of emails I need to reply to.
Interview requests from magazines, blogs who tell me about a review they just posted, collaborations requests, and more. You name it.
I’m always hungry for more, and love to read your feedbacks, so don’t hesitate to drop me an email when you feel like to.
On another hand, I recently started to collaborate with Lost At E Minor. They asked me to post reviews about stuffs I like. So if you produce amazing and inspiring artworks, feel free to contact me.
Talk soon.
Have a Mega day.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Better get ‘em, where you at bro?J DILLA – Reckless Driving

Brain dead flow
LIL WAYNE

My brain is dead.
My hands are well alive.
I use them every day to produce inspiring artworks and slick drawings.
At least I try to.
I hope that you enjoy my productions and feel inspired by my fonts experiments.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Brain dead flowLIL WAYNE – Break Up

I Just Murdered The Alphabet
Character 1

I did this artwork for my solo art exhibition called I Just Murdered The Alphabet

Starting from today, I’ll post a drawing a day for the next 5 months.
And I’m not talking about a quick doodle. I will post an inspiring drawing.
The kind of awesome art I prepared with my heart and soul.
You don’t believe me?
My name is Mega. Just watch.
check the complete solo art exhibition.

Medium used: Hand-drawn with silver ink pens on 160g acid free art paper.

Hip-hop punchlines inspiration:
Does it pay to be deaf, dumb and blind?KILLAH PRIEST – B.I.B.L.E. (Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth)
Yo yo yo yo yo yoBUSTA RHYMES – Mythsysizer
I flash brilliance in the form of the naked truthVAKILL – The Crown Don’t Move
Make this shit look easyCURREN$Y – Real Estates
Damn it feels goodJUELZ SANTANA – Damn It Feels Good (to Be A Gangster)
I could never be a thug, they don’t dress this wellCLIPSE – Virginia

Original handmade drawing

Character 1 | Original handmade drawing for my solo art exhibition I Just Murdered The Alphabet

Does it pay to be deaf dumb and blind?
KILLAH PRIEST

Read books, create art, write books, stop watching TV, do more drawings: Be Mega.
As for the religious aspect of this statement, you have to understand that I live in Indonesia, which is the biggest muslim country in the world. I grew up a christian country, and to be more specific I’m based on a hindu island.
For me, religion is about tolerance, living together in mutual respect, and accepting one’s belief.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Does it pay to be deaf dumb and blind?KILLAH PRIEST – B.I.B.L.E. (Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth)

Yo yo yo yo yo
BUSTA RHYMES

This artwork is urban by nature.
This illustration is real.
This is the jungle and it grooves.
This is hip-hop and it doesn’t stop.
This is Mega and you know you love it.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Yo yo yo yo yoBUSTA RHYMES – Mythsysizer

I flash brilliance in the form of the naked truth
VAKILL

In the form of the naked truth.
I showed this artwork to @VAKILL on his twitter, and the man himself said “dope”.
I couldn’t have said it better 😉

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
I flash brilliance in the form of the naked truthVAKILL – The Crown Don’t Move

Make this shit look easy
CURREN$Y

Have you ever watch Messy playing soccer?
Have you ever heard Otis Redding singing soul?
Have you ever seen Mike Tyson boxing?
What’s the common point between all those great artists?
They make what they do look easy.
I am not a star and I don’t pretend anything. I just do my best.
Do you think what I do is easy?
Hum… Then try to do it.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Make this shit look easyCURREN$Y – Real Estates

Damn it feels good
JUELZ SANTANA

The Société Des Griffeurs is the name of the characters you can see in my artworks.
The masked people I draw are part of an imaginary gang.
They live in the jungle, far from the Western rules and societies.
They’re free.
It feels really good.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
Damn it feels goodJUELZ SANTANA – Damn It Feels Good (to Be A Gangster)

I could never be a thug, they don’t dress this well
CLIPSE

I’m not a thug but you can call me a warrior.
I fight everyday of my life to produce more artworks and to stay independent.
I could easily go back to art direction if I wanted to.
But for the moment I like to work freelance and I want to stay free.

Hip-hop punchline inspiration:
I could never be a thug, they don’t dress this wellCLIPSE – Virginia

UGO GATTONI
Interview with the French artist

Ugo Gattoni tells us more about his artworks and his influences in an exclusive interview.

According to me, Ugo Gattoni is one of the most talented up-coming artist of the new generation.
I discovered Ugo’s work recently, through my french representative Lezilus, who decided to represent him too, and showed me his portfolio. I must say that I’m quite impressed by the talent and dedication (it takes a lot to produce such detailed images) of this new comer, and took the opportunity to exchange a few words with this future star of illustration. For me, Ugo is simply the most talented artist I’ve seen in a long long time.
More about Ugo.

Illustration of a tiger head

Illustration of a tiger head

Please introduce yourself
I’m a graphic designer and illustrator from Paris and I’m 23 years old. I finished my studies in 2010 at EPSAA and then I began to work as a freelance directly after.

Artwork of a detailed city typical of the artist slick style

Artwork of a detailed city typical of the artist slick style

How would you describe your work?
It’s quite difficult to say, my work depend of each command of course but in general I attach a great importance to the finition of the product,
I love working with details, always more and more! I want my work to be poetic but also fun; I try to work in both ways.

Ugo Gattoni artwork for Caravan Palace

Ugo Gattoni artwork for Caravan Palace

Please share with us your working process
In general, for illustrations, I process like that :
After having defined the concept, I do some quick roughs depending of the brief, more for the composition than for the design.
Secondly, when it looks good to the client, I do another rough, which show the design of the illustration, more detailed..
Most of the time I draw with rotring or graphite so I can’t have so much retakes, it’s why I insist on the validation of the rough before I begin the final step!

How does your environment influence your art?
I don’t know, I like simple things like food, tinker… I like the countryside, nature… I like kitsch things like old wallpapers… Love drawing with texture like wood, marble, so yes, I think that it’s influence my art, of course, it’s a part of me

The Folding Knife

The Folding Knife

Who are your influences?
I have several influences, it goes from classicals like Dali, Jerome Bosch… to contemporary graphic designers and illustrators like Micah Lidberg, Jonathan Zawada…
It’s important for me to have a look on websites like http://butdoesitfloat.com/ or http://www.septemberindustry.co.uk/…
Those are just some of my references, and You can see that I attach a great importance to graphic design, not just illustration

Portrait drawing by Ugo

Portrait drawing by Ugo

Any last word?
Have a look on Nobrow’s books, something quite cool is coming soon 🙂

MIKE GIANT
Interview with the US artist

Mike Giant is a wonderful artist

Acclaimed worldwide for his prolific work in graffiti, illustration, design and tattoo, Mike Giant is one of the most complete artists of his generation.
After four years studying architecture, Mike Giant started drawing graphics for Think Skateboard in San Francisco, where he spent ten years securing his place in the world of art. It wasn’t until 1998 that he began his inking career, quickly spreading his unique and recognizable style through some of the most reputable shops in USA. Who said Mike “Giant”?
More about Mike.

Mike Giant sexy girls with punk tattoos

Mike Giant sexy girls with punk tattoos

YOU HAVE AN IMPRESSIVE BACKGROUND IN THE GRAPHIC DESIGN INDUSTRY, SO WHY DID YOU WAIT THAT LONG BEFORE STARTING YOUR TATTOO CAREER?
I was just waiting for the right teacher. I had seen the ugly side of tattooing early on, so I knew it would have to be just the right situation for me to get involved. I had been getting tattooed by Nalla in San Francisco in the mid 90s. He was working at Tattoo City then. We got to be friends, and then he bought East Side in NYC, and offered to teach me how to tattoo so I could go to NY and work for him there. At the time I was doing Photoshop and web work for an animation company in SF. I was looking for a new direction in my life, and it seemed like a reasonable next step.

Mike Giant graffiti

Mike Giant graffiti

HOW DOES THE PERMANENT ESSENCE OF TATTOO AFFECT YOUR APPROACH TO DRAWING, COMPARED TO ILLUSTRATION AND (EVEN MORE) GRAFFITI, WHICH ARE REALLY TRANSIENT BY NATURE?
I approach illustration and tattoo design from basically the same point. There are more limitations in skin, but the way I execute the idea to fruition feels the same. To me, the tattoo will last the life of the wearer, maybe 90 years? I’ve seen illustrations that are a few hundred years old. So what’s more “permanent” really? Graffiti is something I just do on the spot these days. I do it when it feels right. I don’t draw much graffiti at all anymore.

Mike Giant Scissors sexy girl

Scissors sexy girl

AS AN ILLUSTRATOR, YOU ARE FAMOUS FOR WORKING ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY IN BLACK AND WHITE, SO IS YOUR REALLY COLORFUL TATTOO STYLE A MATTER OF MEDIUM?
Yes, I’d be quite happy to only do black and grey tattoos. I’ve got nothing against color though. I have tons of color on my own body. But, I’m red and green color-blind, so I don’t see subtlety in tone and hue. Somehow that has worked to my advantage in the modern commercial art market. Tattoos need high contrast color schemes to hold up over time. Luckily, that works well with my simplistic sense of color.

mike giant skateboard girl

Skateboard girl

AFTER MORE THAN TEN YEARS LIVING AROUND THE WORLD, YOU FINALLY CAME BACK TO YOUR NATIVE CITY ALBUQUERQUE WHERE YOU OPENED A TATTOO SHOP (STAY GOLD). WAS THIS NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT AN IMPORTANT PART OF YOUR GROWING IDENTITY AS AN ARTIST?
Well, since I’ve been back here for a few years, I can see just how much of my identity is from this place. I feel comfortable here.
I love the sky, the clean air, the seasons, the food, the women, and the cheap living. It’s a good life. It feels good to make art that pays homage to this wonderful place in the world. And at times, I still feel a real bond with the Bay Area. I spent 10 formative years there. It really set the stage for what’s happening right now. I also see my time in London and New York as really important times in developing my identity as an artist.

Mike Giant eagle and snake

Eagle and snake fighting

FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS, YOU DID ALL THE ARTWORK FOR A CLOTHING COMPANY CALLED REBEL8. DO YOU CONSIDER THIS WORK LIKE ANOTHER WAY TO GET YOUR ART ON PEOPLE’S BODIES?
I’ve been drawing graphics for t-shirts for many years. I love graphic t-shirts. Always have. A few years ago, I was approached by my friend Josh to start an exclusive label. I had been doing a lot of illustrations for various companies, and he thought I had enough of a fan base to go solo. So we got the ball rolling and it’s been great ever since. We’re growing fast, and having a lot of fun. We’ve got some ill shit lined up for 2007.

DID YOUR SUCCESS AS A WORLDWIDE COMMISSIONED ILLUSTRATOR CHANGE YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH TATTOOING, AS YOU DON’T HAVE TO DO IT FOR ECONOMIC REASONS ANYMORE?
Yes, things have changed. I never thought I could earn more money doing freelance illustrations than tattooing, but that’s the current state. And frankly, I enjoy the time alone in my studio more than the time I spend at the shop now. It’s something I’ll continue to do for the rest of my life, but only on a select group of old friends, almost as a favor. I have a lot of love for tattooing. I respect it. It kicked my ass. I’m almost suited, and I still get excited to feel the sting. It’s just something I don’t need to do for a job anymore.

JAMES JIRAT PATRADOON
Interview with the Australian artist

James Jirat Patradoon interview

Born in Thailand and raised in Sydney since the age of one, James Patradoon grew up exposed to the richness of both Asian and Aussie cultures.
Spending most of his childhood reading and drawing cartoons, he woke up one day as a teenager facing this terrible truth about his future: no matter the intensity of his passion for superheroes, he won’t ever become one of them. So what? Should he renounce without even trying? That’s not what a superhero would have done anyway, so James took his super pen, and decided to go further into his dream, helped along by his superpowers to create fantastic images.
More about James Jirat.

Double spread page interview

Double spread page interview of James Jirat Patradoon published in Acclaim magazine

SO, COMIC BOOKS LOOK LIKE AN OBVIOUS INSPIRATION FOR YOUR WORK…
I like to expose myself to a lot of imagery and stories. On top of reading a lot of comic books, I used to watch four movies a night. I would have insane dreams and my head would always be a swirl of lingering images that would inspire me to work. It is the way stories look and the way people interpret stories into images that interest me. I don’t know where I found the time to watch so many movies, screenprint, and write a thesis. I think I was tapping into some unknown dimension. I also read a lot of random books and so I’m always writing down quotes from movies and books to turn into artworks. I often come up with titles before I come up with images. I write a lot more than I draw.

James Jirat Patradoon photo portrait

James Jirat Patradoon photo portrait

WHERE DOES YOUR MASKED CHARACTER COME FROME?
It is an idea that snowballed that I haven’t really been able to articulate in a definitive way. The teenage vigilante you see in my work is a self-portrait. My work explores the idea of masculinity being made up of two halves: a normal, level-headed, nice side, and a violent, aggressive, dark side. Most of us are either one or the other, but a ‘real man’ can apparently balance both. I created this aggressive alter ego in my work that fights and bleeds so that together we can become a ‘real man’. I’m presenting the dark side of masculinity as a cartoon, because that is where young boys get most their ideas about definitions of masculinity. I’ve always been interested in how the fictional world can affect the real world, and in these works I look at how masculine identities we learn at a young age from fiction eventually get incorporated into our adult lives.

Mural huge painting

Mural huge painting by James Jirat Patradoon

NOW YOU’VE FINISHED YOUR ART DEGREE, WHAT DO YOU EXPECT FOR YOUR FUTURE?
I get waves upon waves of people telling me I’m destined for a future of unemployment and financial ruin now that I have a fine arts degree, but I wouldn’t have done things any other way. When you think about an era in time you think about the art/music/photography of that time – I want to be a part of that cultural timeline and carve my own niche into it – I want to contribute to our grand narrative, even if it is a very small part. I’m not sure what to expect for the future, but I’ve always hoped that I could work from anywhere in the world, like a park bench in New York of a café in Barcelona and just upload artwork to clients. That’s the freedom that internet gives us, we should exploit it by working outside of the home or office, not being hostage to a cubicle.

Drawing by the Thai and Australian artist

Drawing by the Thai and Australian artist James Jirat Patradoon

WHAT DO YOU USUALLY DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT WORKING?
I have a part time job at DVD Store, so I’m usually there trying to save up money for a ticket back to Japan or to go to New York. When I’m not there I’m either hanging out in bookstores flicking through art/design books for inspiration or spending my nights staying up wasting my time one way or another, I have a sleeping disorder, I’m awake at the strangest hours.

Street art by James Jirat Patradoon

Street art by James Jirat Patradoon

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?
At the moment I’m working on a series of gang inspired drawings, which I will turn into screenprints. The work is based on the aesthetic of movies like The Outsiders, Rumble Fish, Clockwork Orange, Young Guns and The Warriors. I’m really interested in the group identity that gangs present through their members and the way they look. I’m taking the idea of a superhero team and trying to find a point where fiction and reality crossover, it is about being part of something and defining yourself through a group rather than as an individual.

James Jirat Patradoon black and white artwork

James Jirat Patradoon black and white artwork

JEREMYVILLE
Interview with the Australian artist

Jeremyville interview for Acclaim magazine.

Interview of the Australian artist Jeremyville. Life is a fairy tale.
I did this interview a while ago for Acclaim magazine.
More about Jeremyville.

Jeremyville vinyl toy

Jeremyville vinyl toy

Before becoming one of the most recognized Australian artists, the man behind Jeremyville spent a wonderful childhood growing up in Wonderland Avenue, near Bondi in Sydney. The beach boy used to spend a lot of time playing with Lego, Smurfs, sea monkeys, toy soldiers, and reading heaps of Tin Tin, Richard Scary, and Mr Men books. This led him naturally to think that making a career out of drawing stuff would be a pretty fun option. So, a couple of sketch-books later, he studied architecture at Sydney Uni, began drawing at the Sydney Morning Herald, and simply became one of today’s freshest illustrators. Well, who said life wasn’t easy?

Jeremyville interview for Shift magazine

Jeremyville for Shift magazine

WHAT IS THE CONCEPT BEHIND YOUR NAME JEREMYVILLE?
Jeremyville is a project-based concept; it’s a place where projects and collaborations happen. Like Vinyl Will Kill, the first book in the world on designer toys, that I wrote, or a sketchel bag for Beck, or a collab’ comic with Geoff McFetridge, or a shoe design for Converse. It can be anything interesting and exciting to me, I don’t limit myself to just one medium, like just apparel. I feel comfortable doing lots of things, sometimes at once! I also like trying new things, new mediums, this keeps me excited. For example right now I’m doing some animation with a company in Argentina, a snowboard design for Rossignol in Utah, a toy with Super Rad toys in LA, preparing for a solo art show in Paris, an animation for a UK company, a group art show in Rome, t-shirt designs for Graniph in Japan, a comic book for a French publishing company. I like mixing it up.

Jeremyville street artwork

Jeremyville street artwork

WHAT ABOUT THIS WORK YOU HAD AS A CARTOONIST FOR THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD?
It was a great learning experience, as I had to come up with ideas for the paper on a daily basis, and quickly. You have no time to wait for the angel of inspiration to come down and gently whisper into your ear. You have to grab the angel by the neck and squeeze an idea out. I like working fast, and thinking fast. I don’t like to over-think a project, usually my first instinct for a solution is the best.

Jeremyville Sessions book cover

Jeremyville Sessions book cover

YOU DEVELOP YOUR WORK ON VARIOUS MEDIUMS FROM FINE ART, TO PUBLISHING, TO APPAREL, ETC. WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND YOUR APPROACH TO A NEW PROJECT?
Each medium is different, and requires a new set of principles to work with. But I keep a general aesthetic running through my work, this makes everything I do very recognizable as Jeremyville, from a t-shirt, to a book, to an animation. Whatever you do, you need to do it very well, as if that is all you do. Because there are people out there who only do one thing, so I never just dabble in something, I try and become expert at it, to do it the best I can, and add something to the medium.

Artwork by Jeremyville

Artwork by Jeremyville

HOW DID YOU MANAGE TO BLEND YOUR ARTISTIC INTEGRITY WITH COMMERCIAL SUCCESS?
I’m a very harsh critic of my work, so only when I feel something is really good, does it leave my studio. Also, for commercial work I generally choose images I have already drawn for personal reasons in my sketchbook, so there is an authenticity to my commercial work also, I’m not like a gun for hire. Clients come to me for what I do, and I generally choose something appropriate for them. Like for Rossignol snowboards, they just asked me to draw whatever I thought would work, and to just write Rossignol on there somewhere, it was a very open brief. Clients seem to trust me, and let me do my own thing.

DO YOU RECKON THAT THE RECOGNITION OVERSEAS OF PEOPLE LIKE YOU OR NATHAN JUREVICIUS IS OPENING SOME DOORS FOR A NEXT GENERATION OF AUSSIES ARTISTS?
I hope it is helping open some doors for Aussies, I don’t generally push the obvious Australian angle in my work, simply because I’m influenced by lots of things globally, and I’m probably mentally more at my studio in New York than my Sydney studio. Also, my work is more from a place called Jeremyville than any other city on earth. The colours of Australia I’m sure have influenced my work, and I grew up in a beach side suburb in Sydney, and that has to have had an influence, but I can’t isolate it, or put it into words, It’s just a part of me.

EBOY
Interview with the godfathers of pixel

eboy draw your word in pixels.

A lil’ interview with the godfathers of pixel, I mean of course the artists trio eBoy.
Undisputed sovereigns of pixel art, The graphic collective Eboy has developed throughout the years a sophisticated artwork where you can see rampaging robots climbing big buildings next to tanned bikini girls, all of it in a complex and fun looking 3D world. With their shiny style, Steffen Sauerteig, Svend Smital and kai Vermehr have quickly earned worldwide recognition, and caught the eye of companies as big as MTV, Honda, or Coca-Cola. Kai brings us beyond the screen and explains to ACCLAIM how Eboy became one of today’s finest art crews.
More about Acclaim magazine.
More about the godfathers of pixel.

Eboy artwork Berlin

Pixel drawing of Berlin

LET’S GO BACK TO THE EARLY DAYS. HOW DID YOU ALL MEET?
Svend and Steffen knew each other for a long time. I met Steffen at MetaDesign around 1996. After we left there we started gaming together. Soon we decided to start a website with fun pixel stuff on it and registered eBoy.com. Soon Svend joined and from there it just evolved.

WHAT IS THE INFLUENCE OF THE INTERNET ON YOUR WORK?
At the beginning we only wanted to work for the screen. We were not using the internet yet. All the stuff was distributed on diskettes on a viral basis. But as soon we got connected it was obvious that our work for the screen was perfect for the internet playground. So from there on we focused on it as our main medium.
We also use the internet extensively as a communication and research tool between us. We use txt, audio and video chat, flickr, etc. etc. So it is just everywhere.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST DIFFICULTY IN USING PIXELS AS A DESIGN TECHNIQUE?
I’d say it’s restriction to a square which makes organic shapes difficult. But this difficulty is what makes this technique so much fun to work with. It makes you work hard but guides you to a level of abstraction that we enjoy very much.

eboy animated gif

WHERE DOES YOUR OBSESSION WITH BIG CITIES COME FROM?
Well, it’s the place where life condenses and we do probably prefer to live – it’s where we actually are. But there are many cool places, it does not have to be a city probably…

eboy animated gif

Flying Taiwan Dragon artwork

WAS THE BERLIN ENVIRONMENT AN INFLUENCE IN THIS CHOICE?
Only because we live here and that influences us. We love Berlin, it’s a city of change and electric energy with many many faces. It’s something you sure see in our work.

iPad cool design case

iPad cool design case

WITH INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION FROM THE DESIGN COMMUNITY, AND AN ENDLESS LIST OF MAJOR CLIENTS FROM NIKE TO COCA-COLA, WHAT KIND OF CHALLENGES STILL KEEP YOU MOTIVATED?
We are currently working on a new hot toy series with Kidrobot coming out in September. This is the major project at the moment. We’re also doing a Los Angeles poster for Honda, and I‘m personally working on my drumming skills. We’ll see what’s next.