I Just Murdered The Alphabet reviews

I Just Murdered The Alphabet reviews

I Just Murdered The Alphabet has been reviewed in many magazines, blogs, websites, and various medias.
Here are some of the titles who talked about my art project.
check the complete solo art exhibition.

DESIGN YOU TRUST

Design You Trust is a design community who review new design trends, art events and… Mega new series.
With more than 2 millions page views every month, it’s quite a really good deal to be featured in this blog founded in 2007 by Dmitry Utkin. So I have one thing to say: Thank you Dmitry for creating this great media, and thank you Design You Trust for featuring me!

LIFE LOUNGE

Lifelounge is a digital media and entertainment company based in Australia.
Australia’s No. 1 youth & entertainment website reviewed my new art series, and you can see some exclusive previews of my upcoming show at Sergeant Paper.

COMPLEX

Complex magazine just posted news about Mega new art series.
For over 3 years, I contributed with a full-page in each issue in this cross-cultural lifestyle magazine. A couple of days ago they did a cool post on the art section of their blog.

LOST AT E MINOR

Mega in Lost At E Minor
The famous online publication of inspiring art and pop culture had me talk about my new art series.
With guest contributors such as Shepard Fairey or Ron English, I was quite honored to contribute in selecting cool stuffs to post. From now on, I will add fresh and inspiring news every week. Keep checking the website for more info.

CONTRA

CONTRA is a nice publication that explores urban culture in a slick way.
This network of creative people talks about art (and more) in both a daily forum and a quarterly fashion & lifestyle magazine.
They interview and talk to creative people too. They recently reviewed my new art series, and uploaded a bunch of cool Mega pictures just for you.
Make sure that you check their other photography blog, which is inspiring too.

URBANIST

Urbanist is a french blog about Street culture, music, and art.
Today they posted a nice review of my new art series I Just Murdered The Alphabet. They talk about my background and say cool stuff about me. How do you expect me not to share an article that starts with “Brilliant illustrator, Mega…” ;)

OLYBOP

New interview (in french) on Olybop.
Olybop is a blog talking about culture, graphic design and art. Today they featured my new series I Just Murdered The Alphabet, and we exchanged a few words.

SIX AND 5

My friends from Six And Five just made a nice post about my artwork series.
Remember, Sixand5 showed me some love in the past, and have always been supportive with my artworks.

PROTEUS MAG

Proteus mag chose me as their artist of the day.
This inspirational online magazine managed by Dustin Parker putted me on the front page. Thanks!

TREND HUNTER

I Just Murdered The Alphabet turns into a trend.
CNN, MTV, Kanye West, Paris Hilton, MTV and much more trend-setters have cited Trendhunter as one of the biggest source of inspiration on the web. Oh, and they like my work too ;)

DISASSOCIATED

Consortium of the cool.
Disassociated was founded by John Lampard, who started this great website about pop culture, design art, and more in 1997.

DR COTTON

Thanks Doc, it’s sick!
I met the founder od Dr Cotton when I was in Melbourne for my previous touring exhibition. The guys were really cool, and even bought me some art prints. One year later they promote my new series, blog about it, tweet about it, facebook about it… Every day!

LEZILUS

My french representative is awesome.
Lezilus is my french representative. He’s a wonderful person who allows me to reach corporate customers in all the french-speaking countries. We work together since many years, and it has always been a great pleasure for me to deal with such a professional person. Thank you Lezilus!

INTERVIEW WITH DR COTTON

Dr Cotton has published a huge Mega interview.
In this interview, I talk about my art inspirations, my artistic background, and introduces the concepts behind my new series of artworks.
The Australian apparel brand also publish a daily Mega news on their Facebook and Twitter accounts.
I really appreciate the support.
They have already posted a review on my series of handmade drawings.
This is still a secret, but I may soon produce an artwork printed on T-shirt in collaboration with the Australian clothing brand.
Stay tuned for more information.

YOUR ART HERE

You Art Here is a French website that presents hot and fresh art news.
They interviewed me last year to talk about my 2011 touring exhibition.
Today they decided to support my artworks, and they present an exclusive portfolio based on my art series I Just Murdered The Alphabet.

SUPERLATIVE

Superlative is an art blog based in Germany.
They have published a really long interview in which I talk about my artworks and give more information about the concept behind La Société Des Griffeurs.

FRINGE BENEFITS

Fringe Benefit is an art website from Adelaide, Australia.
They talk about anything related to musical venues and art news.
They have recently reviewed my new series of drawings, with nice words to describe my artworks.
Thank you guys!

GRAPHIC ART NEWS

Last but not least, Graphicart News has published a new I Just Murdered The Alphabet review.
The art blog focusses on design and photography, and offers a portfolio with pictures of my latest artworks.

I Just Murdered The Alphabet reviews

Collection of reviews I received online for my art series I Just Murdered The Alphabet

Don’t forget to have a look on the new drawings I have created for my upcoming exhibition.
The exhibition will be presented in Paris next October at the Sergeant Paper gallery.
You may also remember the gallery, because I presented my art series Longing To Be Knotted Together in the same place last year for the Paris stop of my touring exhibition.

I would be happy to answer your questions for more I Just Murdered The Alphabet reviews.
Feel free to use my contact form to send me a message.
Let’s talk soon!

KILL PIXIE
Interview with the Australian artist

Kill Pixie interview

“After watching Kill Pixie burning his fingers and his mindframe to the bone, those of us in his immediate vicinity took it upon ourselves to shed some light into this already luminous world of him, just so you know that everything is a-okay.
Jaime Fazackerley is a filmmaker of independent skateboarding films, and wears pants that are hemmed to show his socks.
George Ribbon recently arrived on our couch, or rather the pull out mattress, from his hometown of NYC, where he is a photographer.
Brett Chan is a futurist, who recently released the film ruthless, he just set up a new board, where he customized a shane cross graphic.”

Brett Chan

CAN YOU GIVE US A LITTLE BACKGROUND ON YOURSELF?
Killpixie: I live in Sydney.
Jaime: Killpixie likes to climb up on big backgrounds where citizens can see his finesse. Lately he has been in the cave concocting artwork for the indoor audience.

Kill Pixie characters

Kill Pixie characters

YOU’LL HAVE A SHOW IN MELBOURNE IN FEBRUARY, WHAT IS IT ALL ABOUT?
Jaime: It’s all about communication and little men running around with shoes.
Killpixie: It’s called ‘EVERYTHINGS A-OK’ and opens on the 20th of Feb at Until Never Gallery, Hosier Lane, Melbourne. New Works and installation. Also it’s the launch of my book Kill Communication.
Brett Chan: On a greater level these works speak of the transormation of things, the osmosis of worlds. The flux of min-sets or internal circumstances. A comment on this pinball game we are all playing.
George: It’s all about destruction. Trucks, walls, roller doors, rooftops, this kind of destruction is in the past. Killpixie is now watching forward, seeing the swarms of creatures destroying themselves, their idols, their ability to see and understand what is right in front of them. And selling paintings.

Mark Whalen painting

Mark Whalen painting

WHAT STUDIO PAINTING AND COMMISSIONED EXHIBITIONS ALLOWS/BRINGS YOU THAT STREET ACTION WOULDN’T, AND VICE VERSA?
Killpixie: It allows me to explore and create more thought out and detailed work rather than my street work which is more quick and simple.

YOU WORK IN CHINA HEIGHTS, WHICH IS AN OPEN SPACE STUDIO IN SYDNEY. HOW THE INTERACTIONS WITH THE OTHER ARTISTS INFLUENCE YOUR PRODUCTION?
Killpixie: No I dont work at China Heights but I have worked with them on projects in the past and had openings with them, they are great to work with and they are supporting good things in the art world.

Sketch book by the artist

Sketch book by the artist

APART FROM THAT, WHO AND WHAT INSPIRE YOU?
Killpixie: I get inspired from different styles of folk art/folklore, cutlures and influences from the past, and different pattern and linear illustration styles.
Brett: Killpixie dreams of scapes.
Of paths to negate.
In realms that carry
More so than the lesser.
A magnitude in weight.

artwork by Mark Whalen aka Kill Pixie

Artwork by Mark Whalen aka Kill Pixie

WHAT DO YOU PLAN TO DO AFTER THIS INTERVIEW?
Killpixie: Painting.
Brett: If we are fortunate enough, killpixie might be around long enough to clean up the dishes, and allow us an unravelling thread into our world that surrrounds us.
George: Watch me get stoned, eat candy and watch movies.
Jaime: Business men they drink my beer, and they paint my earth, none of them knowing what any of this is worth.

JAMES JIRAT PATRADOON
Interview with the Australian artist

James Jirat Patradoon interview

Born in Thailand and raised in Sydney since the age of one, James Patradoon grew up exposed to the richness of both Asian and Aussie cultures.
Spending most of his childhood reading and drawing cartoons, he woke up one day as a teenager facing this terrible truth about his future: no matter the intensity of his passion for superheroes, he won’t ever become one of them. So what? Should he renounce without even trying? That’s not what a superhero would have done anyway, so James took his super pen, and decided to go further into his dream, helped along by his superpowers to create fantastic images.
More about James Jirat.

Double spread page interview

Double spread page interview of James Jirat Patradoon published in Acclaim magazine

SO, COMIC BOOKS LOOK LIKE AN OBVIOUS INSPIRATION FOR YOUR WORK…
I like to expose myself to a lot of imagery and stories. On top of reading a lot of comic books, I used to watch four movies a night. I would have insane dreams and my head would always be a swirl of lingering images that would inspire me to work. It is the way stories look and the way people interpret stories into images that interest me. I don’t know where I found the time to watch so many movies, screenprint, and write a thesis. I think I was tapping into some unknown dimension. I also read a lot of random books and so I’m always writing down quotes from movies and books to turn into artworks. I often come up with titles before I come up with images. I write a lot more than I draw.

James Jirat Patradoon photo portrait

James Jirat Patradoon photo portrait

WHERE DOES YOUR MASKED CHARACTER COME FROME?
It is an idea that snowballed that I haven’t really been able to articulate in a definitive way. The teenage vigilante you see in my work is a self-portrait. My work explores the idea of masculinity being made up of two halves: a normal, level-headed, nice side, and a violent, aggressive, dark side. Most of us are either one or the other, but a ‘real man’ can apparently balance both. I created this aggressive alter ego in my work that fights and bleeds so that together we can become a ‘real man’. I’m presenting the dark side of masculinity as a cartoon, because that is where young boys get most their ideas about definitions of masculinity. I’ve always been interested in how the fictional world can affect the real world, and in these works I look at how masculine identities we learn at a young age from fiction eventually get incorporated into our adult lives.

Mural huge painting

Mural huge painting by James Jirat Patradoon

NOW YOU’VE FINISHED YOUR ART DEGREE, WHAT DO YOU EXPECT FOR YOUR FUTURE?
I get waves upon waves of people telling me I’m destined for a future of unemployment and financial ruin now that I have a fine arts degree, but I wouldn’t have done things any other way. When you think about an era in time you think about the art/music/photography of that time – I want to be a part of that cultural timeline and carve my own niche into it – I want to contribute to our grand narrative, even if it is a very small part. I’m not sure what to expect for the future, but I’ve always hoped that I could work from anywhere in the world, like a park bench in New York of a café in Barcelona and just upload artwork to clients. That’s the freedom that internet gives us, we should exploit it by working outside of the home or office, not being hostage to a cubicle.

Drawing by the Thai and Australian artist

Drawing by the Thai and Australian artist James Jirat Patradoon

WHAT DO YOU USUALLY DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT WORKING?
I have a part time job at DVD Store, so I’m usually there trying to save up money for a ticket back to Japan or to go to New York. When I’m not there I’m either hanging out in bookstores flicking through art/design books for inspiration or spending my nights staying up wasting my time one way or another, I have a sleeping disorder, I’m awake at the strangest hours.

Street art by James Jirat Patradoon

Street art by James Jirat Patradoon

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?
At the moment I’m working on a series of gang inspired drawings, which I will turn into screenprints. The work is based on the aesthetic of movies like The Outsiders, Rumble Fish, Clockwork Orange, Young Guns and The Warriors. I’m really interested in the group identity that gangs present through their members and the way they look. I’m taking the idea of a superhero team and trying to find a point where fiction and reality crossover, it is about being part of something and defining yourself through a group rather than as an individual.

James Jirat Patradoon black and white artwork

James Jirat Patradoon black and white artwork

JEREMYVILLE
Interview with the Australian artist

Jeremyville interview for Acclaim magazine.

Interview of the Australian artist Jeremyville. Life is a fairy tale.
I did this interview a while ago for Acclaim magazine.
More about Jeremyville.

Jeremyville vinyl toy

Jeremyville vinyl toy

Before becoming one of the most recognized Australian artists, the man behind Jeremyville spent a wonderful childhood growing up in Wonderland Avenue, near Bondi in Sydney. The beach boy used to spend a lot of time playing with Lego, Smurfs, sea monkeys, toy soldiers, and reading heaps of Tin Tin, Richard Scary, and Mr Men books. This led him naturally to think that making a career out of drawing stuff would be a pretty fun option. So, a couple of sketch-books later, he studied architecture at Sydney Uni, began drawing at the Sydney Morning Herald, and simply became one of today’s freshest illustrators. Well, who said life wasn’t easy?

Jeremyville interview for Shift magazine

Jeremyville for Shift magazine

WHAT IS THE CONCEPT BEHIND YOUR NAME JEREMYVILLE?
Jeremyville is a project-based concept; it’s a place where projects and collaborations happen. Like Vinyl Will Kill, the first book in the world on designer toys, that I wrote, or a sketchel bag for Beck, or a collab’ comic with Geoff McFetridge, or a shoe design for Converse. It can be anything interesting and exciting to me, I don’t limit myself to just one medium, like just apparel. I feel comfortable doing lots of things, sometimes at once! I also like trying new things, new mediums, this keeps me excited. For example right now I’m doing some animation with a company in Argentina, a snowboard design for Rossignol in Utah, a toy with Super Rad toys in LA, preparing for a solo art show in Paris, an animation for a UK company, a group art show in Rome, t-shirt designs for Graniph in Japan, a comic book for a French publishing company. I like mixing it up.

Jeremyville street artwork

Jeremyville street artwork

WHAT ABOUT THIS WORK YOU HAD AS A CARTOONIST FOR THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD?
It was a great learning experience, as I had to come up with ideas for the paper on a daily basis, and quickly. You have no time to wait for the angel of inspiration to come down and gently whisper into your ear. You have to grab the angel by the neck and squeeze an idea out. I like working fast, and thinking fast. I don’t like to over-think a project, usually my first instinct for a solution is the best.

Jeremyville Sessions book cover

Jeremyville Sessions book cover

YOU DEVELOP YOUR WORK ON VARIOUS MEDIUMS FROM FINE ART, TO PUBLISHING, TO APPAREL, ETC. WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND YOUR APPROACH TO A NEW PROJECT?
Each medium is different, and requires a new set of principles to work with. But I keep a general aesthetic running through my work, this makes everything I do very recognizable as Jeremyville, from a t-shirt, to a book, to an animation. Whatever you do, you need to do it very well, as if that is all you do. Because there are people out there who only do one thing, so I never just dabble in something, I try and become expert at it, to do it the best I can, and add something to the medium.

Artwork by Jeremyville

Artwork by Jeremyville

HOW DID YOU MANAGE TO BLEND YOUR ARTISTIC INTEGRITY WITH COMMERCIAL SUCCESS?
I’m a very harsh critic of my work, so only when I feel something is really good, does it leave my studio. Also, for commercial work I generally choose images I have already drawn for personal reasons in my sketchbook, so there is an authenticity to my commercial work also, I’m not like a gun for hire. Clients come to me for what I do, and I generally choose something appropriate for them. Like for Rossignol snowboards, they just asked me to draw whatever I thought would work, and to just write Rossignol on there somewhere, it was a very open brief. Clients seem to trust me, and let me do my own thing.

DO YOU RECKON THAT THE RECOGNITION OVERSEAS OF PEOPLE LIKE YOU OR NATHAN JUREVICIUS IS OPENING SOME DOORS FOR A NEXT GENERATION OF AUSSIES ARTISTS?
I hope it is helping open some doors for Aussies, I don’t generally push the obvious Australian angle in my work, simply because I’m influenced by lots of things globally, and I’m probably mentally more at my studio in New York than my Sydney studio. Also, my work is more from a place called Jeremyville than any other city on earth. The colours of Australia I’m sure have influenced my work, and I grew up in a beach side suburb in Sydney, and that has to have had an influence, but I can’t isolate it, or put it into words, It’s just a part of me.

EAMO
Interview with the Australian artist

Eamo is an inspiring Australian artist.

Coming from an industrial city down south of Oz called Geelong (or ‘Geebanger’ as the local’s call it), Eamo grew up down there and drew his way through school, got out and studied design in Melbourne in 2000.
He then worked at various fashion houses around Melbourne until leaving the game early on and giving illustration and art a crack. It has been for four years now that Eamo start killing it, developing a personal and shinny style with this je ne sais quoi of aussie flavor.
Interview originally published in Acclaim magazine.
More about the Australian artist Eamo.

WHAT IS THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND YOUR APPROACH OF A NEW PROJECT?
Often my first thoughts are “how can I add some Australian flavor into this piece?” These days I get approached by clients or collectives for the fact that my work has this style to it; clients are really receptive to it, which is a bonus. But it’s purely a coincidence that aussie stuff is in vogue right now. I’ve always had this weird obsession with it since my childhood. Fingers crossed when the trend dies I’ll still be able to get away with chucking a gum leaf or a prawn into an artwork. And Hopefully my work won’t end up in the same bracket as Yahoo Serious, Koala Blue or Crocodile Dundee, all of which I respect but they where unfortunately casualties of the international ‘Australiana’ fad of the 80s. Good times.

Artwork by Eamo

Artwork by Eamo

DO YOU RECKON THAT THE RECOGNITION OVERSEAS OF PEOPLE LIKE JEREMYVILLE OR BEN FROST IS OPENING SOME DOORS FOR A WHOLE GENERATION OF AUSSIES ARTIST?
No doubt about it. Those two are killing it around the globe; I agree with picking Jeremyville and Ben Frost as examples of aussie’s getting recognition overseas – can’t get any better than those blokes. Ben has been a huge supporter of young up and coming aussie artists, you just have to look at stupidkrap.com – being next to guys like him, Jeremyville, Lister (etc.) on the site is a huge boost for other guys like myself in getting seen by the same international audience as they are.

My interview of Eamo published in Acclaim magazine

My interview of Eamo published in Acclaim magazine

TELL US A BIT MORE ABOUT THE ART SCENE IN MELBOURNE… HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM THE OTHER AUSTRALIAN CITIES?
The Melbourne scene is a tough nut to crack, in the four years I’ve been doing this caper, the last two I’ve managed to notch up six or so shows in Sydney as opposed to one in Melbourne. It’s a classic, when I meet people from Melbourne they always think I’m from Sydney, they look at my art and instantly think “yep, he’s a Bondi bloke” I’ve been told those exact words. And the Sydney folk thought I was a local up until recently. It stems back to my up bringing, I didn’t grow up in the city, I’m practically from the south coast so my art has a distinct aussie feel which is stereotypically more Sydney, whereas Melbourne has a very European culture without that tradition of an outdoor lifestyle.

Fair Suck Of The Pineapple is a detailed artwork by Eamo

Fair Suck Of The Pineapple is a detailed artwork by Eamo

WHAT DO YOU USUALLY DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT WORKING?
Chill at the beach, go to movies, a pub beer and a parma, go for a cruise in the 74 XB Fairmont, barbies.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?
I just finished three new prints for the SemiPermanent exhibition ‘Kids Today’ and a black and white wall installation at the Annadale Hotel in Sydney. Soon I’ll be starting a custom wallet for a new Poketo Australiana series, painting three decks for the No Comply show later this year and another deck, where the artwork is laser burned into the wood, for a group show at China Heights gallery in Sydney. Hooroo!

LISA KING
Interview with the Adelaide artist

Interview with the inspiring Australian female artist Lisa King.

Recently I told you about Lisa King last show Fanciful Faces.
I’m back for more, with an interview and more artworks.
The artist did a lot of successful shows recently and will come to visit me in the island of gods in December.
See you there mate.
More about the Australian female artist Lisa King.

Portrait of Lisa King creating a street artwork

Portrait of Lisa King creating a street artwork

PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF
My name is Lisa King. I am 29 years old, I currently weigh 45 kilos, I can drink like a 45 year old man, I have a neck tattoo of something that resembles symmetry (yet not one on the other side), I am very much a lady that loves wearing black, I recently fell in love with the visual representation on the hindu religion (however as yet has not made its way into the influence of my work) and I hold a beautiful compulsive disorder where I have to be learning new things all the time. Either that or drinking too much wine. My name is Lisa.

Series of three gorgeous artworks exhibited

Series of three gorgeous artworks exhibited

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK?
I usually get in trouble for saying cross medium, but today i dont care. Im way too much of a baby in this game to be knowing exactly what the fuck Im actually doing. So… Im a cross medium artist. I work in the areas of oil painting, sculpture and woodwork and would probably label myself as a low brow painter that is paving a path to a career in fine art. Hectic much?

Sculpture installation for an exhibition

Sculpture installation for an exhibition

PLEASE SHARE WITH US YOUR WORKING PROCESS
I have recently just finished two small solo shows in a few underground bars in Adelaide. The pieces mostly consisting of woodwork and oil paint on longboards, along with some portrait drawings, paintings and prints. Up next Is my very first Gallery solo show, which will be at Magazine in Adelaide, end of November. The work will be a deeper investigation to the process I am working on at the moment; Start with drawing a portrait, sculpt it on a deck, add some woodwork, make some oil paintings and print some stuff here and their. The primary piece for this show however will be the very first large scale oil painting that I have done on canvas. Its a self portrait, a wanky one at that so i wont delve too much. From here i head to Bali, make way to melbourne for some change, hopefully get a residency in Paris for three months and return home for a big fat exhibition titled The French Connection. Downtown LA with the Guys who sponsor me from Loaded Longboards in CA is on the table also. Plans always change though.

Drawing by the Australian artist Lisa King

Drawing by the Australian artist Lisa King

HOW DOES YOUR ENVIRONMENT INFLUENCE YOUR ART
The environment in my head? Im actually a bit of a hermit, so if you can call my apartment an environment then I say… mediocre! The balcony is perfect for the morning coffee and the lounge with the internet gives me all the investigation I need for my influences and updates on the world but besides that Its pretty low key. No plants and landscape thats for sure! Of course I have all the art on my walls and my canvas in front of me which is pretty damn sweet but the city generally does not give me too much, I mean well besides the pub and the regular pissheads. My work is very much people based and as much as i love the characters in this town, im ready to travel, meet new folk and be in fresh environments that do influence me a little more.

Artwork installation based on customized spay-cans

Artwork installation based on customized spay-cans

WHO ARE YOUR INFLUENCES?
Brett Whiteley, Bill Henson, Mark Ryden, Sam Flores, Os Gemeos, my parents, Alonso Sanchez, Miss Van, Camille Rose Garcia, Kathie Olivas, Ron English… to name a few. I would probably throw Andy Warhol in their for being a dick…

Lisa King artwork detail

Lisa King artwork detail

ANY LAST WORD?
Yeah, more people should: watch less TV, drink more alcohol, eat only when hungry, take more influence from simpler and healthier ways of life, give more money to the less fortunate in the world, and try to seek more innate happiness.

PAUL DAVIES
Interview with the Australian painter

Paul Davies tells us more about his artworks in an exclusive interview.

I first met Paul Davies when I was living in Sydney (Australia), working as an art director for Acclaim magazine.
Paul has his studio located at China Heights, the gallery where I was doing the Sydney stop of my last touring exhibition.
A good opportunity to meet again and exchange a few words with this nice and talented artist.
More about the Australian painter Paul Davies.

Paul Davies in his studio in Sydney

Paul Davies in his studio in Sydney

PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF
Paul Davies Australian Artist based in Sydney at China Heights studio.

Painting of a modern house, typical of Paul Davies' work

Painting of a modern house, typical of Paul Davies’ work

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK?
The focus of my painting is predominantly based on the relationship between the built and natural environment.

Exhibition by Paul Davies

Exhibition by Paul Davies

PLEASE SHARE WITH US YOUR WORKING PROCESS
My practice primarily involves photography, stenciling, and acrylic painting, with which my first experiments began in 2002. These works depicted Sydney street scenes mixed with researched popular culture images. The layering process of this technique created on the canvas a visual diary of my immediate surroundings. This method of free association i.e. assembling researched images, collected from my studio floor, onto the canvas, allowed me to experiment with different medium, which is something I still use now to explore various concepts in my work.

Painting on canvas by Paul Davies

Painting on canvas by Paul Davies

HOW DOES YOUR ENVIRONMENT INFLUENCE YOUR ART
I often travel within Australia or overseas, on research trips, to find source material to photograph and sketch. I enjoy this part of the process because I don’t know what I’ll find. When I return to the studio I print these images and stick them up around the space, which gives me inspiration for the paintings. China Heights studio is located close to Sydney’s CBD and I find this urban location vital in creating my works which combine the built and natural environment.

Artwork by the Australian painter Paul Davies

Artwork by the Australian painter Paul Davies

WHO ARE YOUR INFLUENCES?

  • Peter Doig
  • Sergej Jensen
  • Harry Seidler
  • David Schnell
  • Neo Rauch
  • Rachel Whiteread
  • Stefan Kurten
  • Ansel Adams
  • Matthias Weischer

ANY LAST WORD?
Upcoming exhibition “Portraits” at Tim Olsen Gallery, Melbourne, opening 11th October and touring to the Gold Coast City Regional Gallery through November!

Beastman interview
STREET ART OF THE WEEK

Beastman tells us more about his influences and his working process in a cool interview.

Every week, I bring you a selection of some of the best actors of the Street Art movement.
This week, Australian artist Beastman.
More about the Australian street artist.

The Record Store, Sydney

The Record Store, Sydney

PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF
I have lived and worked in Sydney all my life. I make pictures that I like, both small and large, in the studio and on the street.

Numskull / Roach / Beastman / Camperdown, Sydney

Numskull / Roach / Beastman / Camperdown, Sydney

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK?
My work is influenced by the beauty and symbolism behind nature’s repetitive, symmetric, geometric patterns and organic lines, my paintings depict an alternate world of hope and survival.

Mayz Lane, Sydney

Mayz Lane, Sydney

PLEASE SHARE WITH US YOUR WORKING PROCESS
I wake up, eat breakfast, check my emails, make phone calls, then spend the rest of the day working on whatever im working on at the time. It could be a painting, a mural, an illustration, sketching ideas for future paintings, graphic design, curating an exhibition, blogging etc etc. That’s my working process everyday.

Element Collective, Gold Coast

Element Collective, Gold Coast

HOW DOES YOUR ENVIRONMENT INFLUENCE YOUR ART
No not really, only a bit when painting a wall. If the wall is a certain size or shape or whatever… sometimes you change your work to fit into or work with the space.

Brisbane

Brisbane

WHO ARE YOUR INFLUENCES?
I am influenced by the other artists I work with in my studio:

  • Numskull
  • Phibs
  • Max Berry
  • Mark Alsweiler

Some other artists I love are:

  • Richard Colman
  • Mark Whalen
  • Trent Whitehead
  • Jim Houser
  • James Reka
  • Yok
  • Shida
  • Bruno 9Li
  • Mars1
  • Barry Mcgee
  • Escif

There are so many amazing artists out there!

5 Pointz, New York

5 Pointz, New York

ANY LAST WORD?
Lookout for my latest solo show of new style work in Sydney in December 2011.

4ZZZ radio, Brisbane

4ZZZ radio, Brisbane

T-WORLD
Interview with magazine founder Eddy Zammit

T-world founder Eddy Zammit tells us more about his magazine.

T-world is an Australian magazine dealing with everything hot and new when it comes to… T-shirts
I met the editor-in-chief and founder Eddie Zammit (who also runs a tee label) in Melbourne during my exhibition there. We exchange a few words about the industry.
More about the magazine

Portrait Eddy Zammit

Portrait of the magazine founder Eddy Zammit

WHAT IS T-WORLD?
This publication is a hardcover magazine focusing solely on T-shirt culture. It is supposed to come out twice a year, but we’ve been a bit slow at releasing our latest 200-page New York edition. We blame our addiction to quality.

t-world anthony lister

Collaboration with the Australian artist Anthony Lister

HOW DID YOU START THE MAGAZINE?
The magazine was created based on my two great graphic design loves: printed 
T-shirts, and magazines. When I started, I poured my own energy and savings into producing the first issue, after my Dad’s untimely death. Life is short. Follow your true passions, I say. I try to get a lot of the print costs and production bills paid for by advertising. T-world is not one of these niche publications that doesn’t believe in advertising. To me, without paid advertising T-world would truly not exist. Content is king, and so long as there is a divide between both, then that’s the best possible scenario.


HOW DO YOU MAKE YOUR SELECTION?
T-world selects content based primarily on research. The key values we place on promoting artists, designers and labels are; the quality of their art; the originality of the idea and its execution; and finally, longevity. Saying that though, we also support emerging artists and designers.

free wesley

Free Wesley

WHAT MAKES A GOOD T-SHIRT?

Everyone has personal interpretations, which I respect. However, if it were my decision solely, I‘d say a black tee with a graphic print that has a simple colour palette with a pop culture twist.

Collaboration New York Asian Film Festival

Collaboration with the New York Asian Film Festival

WHAT MAKES A BAD T-SHIRT?
Personally, a plain white V-neck T-shirt for guys. I also despise fake T-shirts that have blatantly ripped off other people’s ideas and/or designs.

giant silk screen

Oversized Silk screens

WHAT FUTURE OR EVOLUTION DO YOU IMAGINE FOR THE INDUSTRY?
I imagine the T-shirt world full of MEGA tees. This idea would therefore create a new sizing category – S, M, L, XL and MEGA!! Seriously though, the future is very bright. I genuinely think the T-shirt category is an exciting canvas, and as we move into the future, technology will start to play a key focus with new T-shirt graphics. If we look at how far computers have come in the last 20 odd years, imagine what technology has in store for the humble tee.

TRISTAN KERR
Interview with the Australian artist

Interview with Tristan Kerr, a font artist based in Adelaide, Australia.

When I was in Adelaide for my Longing To Be Knotted Together tour, I met a cool, soft and educated artist named Tristan Kerr.
Cool, soft, and educated ? I swear I was in Australia. The talented and civilized artist is a font master, and I was happy to exchange some of my screen-prints with a couple of his beautiful artworks.
Living in Bali, I dream about an Australia with more Tristan Kerrs, and less shameless bogans (I mean stupid, pretentious, ignorant, and drunk bogans. I mean cricket & footy enthusiasts). Enjoy tasty treats.
Buy Tristan Kerr artworks

PLEASE INTRODUCE YOURSELF
My name is Tristan Kerr, I’m a graphic designer come screen-printer. I’m Australian made but Swiss trained.

Various screen-prints by the Australian artist Tristan Kerr

Various screen-prints by the Australian artist Tristan Kerr

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK?
My work is often a mash of different vintage influences such as Hand Sign writing, nostalgic graphic icons, and 50′s advertising slogans.

Font experimentation printed on a wood deck by Tristan Kerr

Font experimentation printed on a wood deck by Tristan Kerr

PLEASE SHARE WITH US YOUR WORKING PROCESS
My Art is always hand-made from start to finish. From hand illustrating the design/typography, to hand screen-printing the finished piece. My traditional screen-print process allows me to work completely computer free.

Artwork by Tristan Kerr

Artwork by Tristan Kerr

HOW DOES YOUR ENVIRONMENT INFLUENCE YOUR ART
Traveling is a big part of my life, so changing environments continually inspire me. Living in new environments have helped spark new idea’s and approaches to my application of art, whether it’s a Hand Screen-printed poster or a Street Art piece.

Artifact, is a poster by Adelaide artist Tristan Kerr

Artifact, is a poster by Adelaide artist Tristan Kerr

WHO ARE YOUR INFLUENCES?

  • Steve Powers
  • Jeff Canham
  • Grotesk
  • Lowrider
  • Numskull